A Church for Uppaluru

Uppaluru Church

Dad and daughter look in on Uppaluru Church’s inaugural service.

Last month we dedicated another new church building, the first in the village of Uppaluru. Like the Church in Duggivalasa, Uppaluru Church was established by a first-generation Christian, a man born into a traditional Hindu family but radically transformed after a saving encounter with the risen Christ. His name is Anjaneyulu, and his passion to share the Good News of Jesus with those who have never heard it is what led him to Uppaluru.

Like so many of our pastors, Anjaneyulu’s call to ministry came as he read the Gospels. Jesus’s words in Mark 16:15 — “Go into all the world and proclaim the gospel to the whole creation.” — settled deep in Anjaneyulu’s spirit and became the impetus for him to pursue theological training and eventually led him to Uppaluru, an impoverished, rural community with no known Christian presence.

When he arrived in the village in 2011, Anjaneyulu began sharing the Gospel with villagers. Though no one responded to the Message immediately, many listened as he spoke. One of those people was Nagamma, a mother of four who became Anjaneyulu’s first convert. Nagamma’s children soon followed, putting their faith and trust in Jesus Christ. Others in the village did the same. Before he knew it, Anjaneyulu had a church. More importantly, Uppaluru had a church, the community’s first.

Uppaluru Church interior

At the inaugural service, Uppaluru Church was filled to capacity.

By 2014 it had become clear that in order to accommodate the growing congregation a building was needed — a village home no longer provided enough space for the church to gather for worship and prayer. But they had no money or land to build.

Again, just as He had done a few years earlier, God worked through Nagamma. She owned a small piece of property in the village and decided to give it to the church, in memory of her youngest son, Pullayya, whom she had lost months earlier to liver failure. Humbled by Nagamma’s generosity and amazed that such a poor woman was willing to part with such a valuable asset, Pastor Anjaneyulu gratefully received her gift and began slowly building a church. Dedicated just a few weeks ago, the building stands as a testament to God’s grace in the life of Nagamma and her family.

As you have opportunity, please pray for Pastor Anjaneyulu. He has a strong desire to plant more churches, especially in villages that have never heard the Gospel. We’d love to help him do that. Pray, too, for the Church in Uppaluru and our dear sister, Nagamma, as well as her sons and their families. They are subsistence farmers who supplement their income by making bamboo baskets.

Give towards the building of new churches in India.

The growth of our church planting ministry has created an extraordinary opportunity to give towards the building of new churches. In most cases, a new church, like the one in Uppaluru, costs around $5,000 to build. Typically, the pastor oversees construction of the building, and the congregation makes a small but sacrificial contribution towards the project. We are then able to provide a generous grant so that building materials can be purchased and construction can commence. With dozens of churches waiting to be built, your tax-deductible donation to the Church Building Support fund can make a tremendous difference on the ground.

Support church planting in the heart of the 10/40 Window.

We identify, equip, and support church planters in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Odisha. With a passion to bring the Gospel to the unreached, our pastors have established more than 550 churches since 1992, many of them in rural villages like Uppaluru. If you’d like to support church planting in the heart of the 10/40 Window, you can make a donation via our online giving page. When prompted, simply choose “Church Planter Support” from the drop-down menu.


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